July 12, 2020

Saints Edward Media

For Peace and Order

Growing up, I lived in a Suburb of Washington, D.C., roughly halfway between there and Baltimore. At the time, it was safe enough to play outside and make friends. One such friend, when I was around the age of 9, had parents who immigrated from China. As a curious child, I enjoyed visiting his house to try the strange food (that certainly my parents would never allow in the house) like fried squid. We watched countless hours of Dragon Ball Z, and played with all sorts of action figures. We would crawl through every nook and cranny of the house acting out various adventures. On one unfortunate occasion, our snooping around led us to find his parents’ secret stash of pornography. Excited to find new VHS tapes to supplement the Dragon Ball Z, we were exposed to hardcore pornography. Thus began a life-long struggle to break a recurring addiction that I couldn’t shake until well into adulthood. I have experienced first-hand the harmful effects of pornography, that’s why I know it should be banned, and those who produce and/or distribute it should be prosecuted severely.

            Obviously, it isn’t just my lived experience that justifies this. It’s difficult to measure the consumption of pornography in this country because the propaganda in its favor is so strong it’s hardly viewed as negative. However, the fact remains – it is highly addictive. WebMD acknowledges that there are signs and effects of pornography addiction, such as not being able to stay away from it consistently, problems controlling behavior, craving rewarding experiences, and being unable to see the relationship issues caused by heavy use. Not much scientific study is needed if we’re being honest. If you use porn regularly, try and quit – see how difficult it is. WebMD also cites the following negative effects: regular intense urges or cravings for sex, turning to porn when anxious, dissatisfaction with real relationships, stopping things that you enjoy to view more porn, an unfulfilling sex life, and less interest in social encounters. But WebMD is tip-toeing around the issue. For a more through collection of the studies and effects of porn cosumption, check out yourbrainonporn.com. This site lists hundreds of studies to support its findings. The reality is, pornography rewires your brain and chemically resembles those with heavy substance addictions. Consequently, pornography leads to poor mental health, and is linked to depression and anxiety. In fact, it even emulates substance abuse in that you build a tolerance to it, and either need to consume more, or escalate to more extreme forms. Some studies have also shown a link between porn use and poor attitudes towards women, sexual aggression, and rape.

            Our society relies so heavily on academic studies, but it doesn’t take a genius to understand the detrimental effect pornography has on marriages. No normal man can possibly enjoy the thought of his wife pleasuring herself to the images of other men on the internet. And  no normal woman wants to compete with the vast landscape of every kind of woman and sexual deviance out there. Because of all this, many young men are choosing to quit porn. The annual challenge, “No Nut November”, encourages abstinence from porn and masturbation. A seemingly innocuous and healthy thing, but not all are happy with it. Curiously,  some have labelled it fascistic and anti-Semitic. Time Magazine in 2016 covered a study by the American Sociological Association revealing the negative impact pornography has on marriage – a shocking revelation – but I doubt Time Magazine will ever dare to publish another anti-porn article. The study found that people who started watching porn were twice as likely to get a divorce as those who don’t. The study also found that women who kicked the porn habit reduced their likelihood of divorce significantly. However, not a large enough sample size of men abstaining from porn was found to conclude a reduction. Truly a sad state of masculinity.

            You may be an advocate of decriminalizing drug use, and you might not value marriage much, but if the chemical dependence, negative psychological effects, and destruction of marriage doesn’t have you convinced yet, surely you oppose sex trafficking and slavery. fightthenewdrug.com does amazing work in revealing the inseparable link between pornography and sex trafficking. Sexual trafficking is defined as when someone is forced, tricked, or pressured into performing sexual acts. According to the International Labor Organization, 49% of sexually exploited women said porn was made of them while being sold for sex. When you are viewing porn, there is no way to tell for sure if all the participants have consented to the act. Force, fraud, or coercion is used to manipulate the vulnerable or unsuspecting into performing sexual acts on camera. Then traffickers will often sell their videos of their slaves to porn sites. Even professional studios are known to abuse their performers, it’s impossible to know the extent to which they are complicit as well. This is big business. Sex trafficking generates about $99 billion a year, and the porn industry itself is worth about $97 Billion. It’s no wonder why there’s so much resistance to the Ban Porn movement, or No Nut November.

            I lived through early exposure, and an ensuing addiction to pornography myself. It contributed to some of my failed relationships in the past. The grace of God has helped me overcome that. The mass exposure of pornography to the populace is a relatively new phenomena that accompanied the new media and internet. In the beginning, we could be given some slack for not initially realizing just how harmful porn could be, but enough time has elapsed for us to know that pornography is highly addictive, harmful to the brain and body, destroys interpersonal relationships, and feeds the sex trafficking industry. Some critics of banning porn have bemoaned that government shouldn’t be moralizing, or that such a ban wouldn’t be effective.  There are several historic examples that display why they’re wrong. In The Death of West by Pat Buchanan, he points out that prior to 1966 there were only about 6,000 abortions performed each year in the United States. After Roe v. Wade that number has shot up into the millions. We all remember that prior to 2015, holding a traditional stance on marriage was acceptable, but after the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Same Sex Marriage, it was a moral outrage to oppose it. Now you’re a bigot if you want to keep drag queens away from your kids. It’s clear that for the populace at large, morality is downstream from law, at least in many cases. The United States of America needs to ban pornography outright. Those who produce and distribute it should be prosecuted with the same severity as illicit drug pushers are. And those with an addiction should seek help, either through cognitive therapy or sexual addiction support groups.

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